WQWWC #37 – The therapy of Lakes/ Oceans/Water

“To some, it's just water,

To me, it's where I regain my sanity” 
 - Author Unknown

I took a look through my photographs of lakes, oceans and water. I have many examples of water in all its various states.

Water falls down then it blows up….

Water is tranquil then it is turbulent…….

Water is still and then it is stormy……..

Water is white and then it is wavy………..

Water is murky and then it is a reflective mirror………..

How water is reflected back depends on what lens you are looking through.  

Talking to my optometrist today at my very overdue eye check, I mentioned the impact I thought my ‘cataracts’  may be having on my photo editing.  I thought I was over saturating the colours in compensation. He fortunately doesn’t think my cataracts are that bad yet.  He also said that the older Claude Monet got,  the ‘browner’ his paintings had become. Intrigued as I was, what could I do but google……

These landscapes of water and reflection have become an obsession. 
 
- Author: Claude Monet

Monet’s Art Changed Because of His Eyes

“In 1905, Monet was sixty-five and began to notice changes to his vision. The colors he saw were no longer as bright, and his paintings began to feature more yellow and purple tones. In 1912, when he was seventy-two, Monet was diagnosed with nuclear cataracts in both eyes. Because Monet so often repainted the same subjects over the years, viewers can trace the way cataracts affected his vision over time.”

“Scientists have even studied changes in the color and style of Monet’s paintings over time—along with the works of his fellow Impressionist, Degas who also had eye disease. By using computers to simulate the blurriness one would see with eye disease, scientists have been able to find out how the artists likely saw their own paintings, which has given new insights into the artists’ works.”

Monet Might Have Seen Ultraviolet Light

“Initially, Monet did not want to have surgery to correct his cataracts, because he had seen other artists’ careers ended by failed surgery. Monet finally agreed to have cataract surgery on his right eye in 1923, but he did not have the surgery on his left eye, which still had cataracts and could not see violets or blues.”

“During the surgery on his right eye, however, the lens of his eye was removed, which let more light into the eye. Because the lens is the part of the eye that filters out ultraviolet light, it is believed that Monet might have begun seeing ultraviolet wavelengths, which humans typically cannot see. After the surgery, he used more blues in his water lily paintings, which could indicate he was seeing ultraviolet light.”

“After his cataract surgery, he destroyed many of the paintings he created when he suffered the worst of his vision problems. Altogether, he is thought to have destroyed up to 500 of his own paintings.” 

I am not about to destroy my photographs, but I might re-edit some of the saturation – or then again I may not. I do love  bright colours and gazing into water keeps me calm.

Your mind is like water. When it is agitated it becomes difficult to see.

 But if you allow it to settle, the answer becomes clear.”

– Bill Keane

After all is said and done, water is essential to life. And we never know how far the ripples we make when we drop  a stone into the water will spread. 

"THE DROP

Be the drop that falls freely and becomes one with water…..
You might not be able to perceive the ripples you have created right away
But water will allow you to feel how their love
Comes back to you again and again.”

  - Author unknown

https://alwayswrite.blog/2021/08/11/wqwwc-37-lakes-oceans-water/

SundayStills 2021 – Shells and Splashes are White

Seashells are some of my favourite white things.

White shell

Waterfalls are also white…..

Splash play – I love capturing water splashes.


And then there are the little flower people.


And just to wrap up and stay warm try some merino fleece fresh off the sheep.

SundayStills 2021 – my favourite #Landscapes from around the world

Croatia landscapes:

Such happy travel memories of our Croatian trip.Plitvice lakes and Krka waterfalls – so many water-scapes and waterfalls.  Walking alongside, walking across, around and above the waterfalls was a magical experience.  Water, water everywhere.  

“Plitviče Lakes National Park is a 295-sq.-km forest reserve in central Croatia. It’s known for a chain of 16 terraced lakes, joined by waterfalls, that extend into a limestone canyon. Walkways and hiking trails wind around and across the water.

And when we got to Krka we could swim close to the waterfalls. How lucky were we to have this experience when we visited in 2018. 

2020 was the final year in which visitors to Krka National Park were able to swim in Skradinski Buk, the largest and most-popular water asset situated there. From January 2021, the practice of swimming in this section of the park has been banned.

“Krka National Park is situated along the Krka River in southern Croatia. It’s known for a series of 7 waterfalls.  Skradinski buk is one of the most attractive parts of the park. It is a massive, clear, natural pool with high waterfalls at one end and cascades at the other. It is the lowest of the three sets of waterfalls formed along the Krka river.  In an area 400 m in length and 100 m in width there are 17 waterfalls and the total difference in height between the first and the last falls is 47.7 m. 

Swedish landscapes

Where my Swedish family live in Gothenburg, Sweden.

Sweet memories of our most recent overseas trip in 2018 – who knows when we will return?

NZ landscapes
A little closer to home – these images of the South Island of New Zealand are special to me as a ‘mainlander’. Taken over several road trips around the South Island in differing seasons, each has been a particular highlight.

Aoraki, Lake Pukaki and Lake Tekapo- the magical mountains and lakes of the Mackenzie region. 
Aoraki / Mount Cook is the highest mountain in New Zealand. Its height, as of 2014, is listed as 3,724 metres (12,218 feet). It lies in the Southern alps, the mountain range which runs the length of the South Island.”

Hurunui Hinterland – we explored the Hurunui River from the source at Lake Sumner, a remote high country lake through the hinterland and Canterbury Plains to the Culverden basin and thence to the coastline of the Pacific. 

“The Hurunui River is one of the most diverse braided rivers in Canterbury. It has two main branches, each with distinctive attributes originating east of the Main Divide in New Zealand’s Southern Alps. Some 150km long, the total catchment area of the river is 2671 km2.”

My last image has to be an especially favourite landscape though – it is the point of light at the end of the beach where I live.  No matter how far I’ve travelled,  there is no landscape like the one I live in – at home.

And that is the point of this post.

The Point of light – Ohingaroa Bay