Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #165: Going Wide expands my appreciation

 A wide angle lens was the choice I made to capture the magnificent views of New Zealand’s mountains, lakes and valleys.


Man-made structures also look spectacular when viewed with a wide angle.

Leaving the mountains, it was time to appreciate the wide views that form the coastline and islands at the top of the South Island where the river meets the sea.

Wide angle lens truly expands my appreciation.

Lhttps://lagottocattleya.wordpress.com/2021ake/09/14/lens-artists-photo-challenge-165-going-wide/

WQWWC # 36: Lofty Mountain

Whāia te iti kahurangi ki te tūohu koe me he maunga teitei

Seek the treasure you value most dearly: if you bow your head, let it be to a lofty mountain


This whakatauki (Maori proverb) is about aiming high or for what is truly valuable, but it’s real message is to be persistent and don’t let obstacles stop you from reaching your goal.


Each time I venture near to the highest mountain of the Southern Alps of New Zealand, I look to photograph another perspective of this magnificent mountain.,  This proverb goes some way to describing how I feel when this mountain is in front of my camera.

On clear days, Aoraki / Mount Cook is visible from the West Coast as far north as Greymouth, some 150 kilometres away, and from most of State Highway 80 along Lake Pukaki and State Highway 6 south of Lake Pukaki. The near horizontal ridge connecting the mountain’s three summits forms a distinctive blocky shape when viewed from an eastern or western direction.

Aoraki / Mount Cook is the highest mountain in New Zealand. Its height, as of 2014, is listed as 3,724 metres (12,218 feet).

https://alwayswrite.blog/2021/08/04/wqwwc-36-writers-choice-or-mountains/

Winter Whites, Life in Colour June

As  I sit here on a wet winter Saturday, the view out the window is almost a white-out as the clouds are sitting low against  a very grey sea.  The ducks are ducking their heads under to snatch some duckweed.. Their movement is noticeable only in the ripples they create in the otherwise calm waters.

Tiny waves are gently lapping the beach forming tidal patterns at the water’s edge.  Currents show as a deeper silver on the still waters. The tidal flow is creeping quietly up the gravel beach, surrounding the huge driftwood log that has been stranded since being cast ashore in the last storm. It now serves a a roosting perch for cormorants as they dry their wings and digest the fish they dived under the waves to catch.

It must be time to post some silver and white images for Life in Colour – June.

I will start with some  seascapes and seagulls in silver. 

There are mountains of mountain images in my April/May archives – here are but a few with that white stuff called snow and a scattering of clouds.

And there were the frosty foggy finds… 

And I still love to capture splashes of white

I may yet find more silver or white before the end of June.

https://traveltalk.me.uk/2021/06/06/life-in-colour-37/