WQW – 5 Senses: Tasting the memories

Aaah the taste of Bluff Oysters – the new season started 1 March, and at last my blog posts will restart this month. 

I have been MIA for most of February due to our extended summer road trip through areas with limited wifi reception.  I have focused – pardon the pun – on using my camera extensively rather than blogging. 

“Pull up a chair

TAKE A TASTE

Come join us.

Life is so endlessly DELICIOUS.”

Ruth Reichl

This quote is meant to be about food but let’s take it a step further. I have been tasting the delights of travelling around the stunning South Island, especially Central Otago, Fiordland and Southland. I’ve been chasing rivers and waterfalls, mountains and fiords, and the elusive Lady Aurora herself. The Aurora Australis remained elusive but the waterfalls were amazing.

Central Otago: 

Parked over alongside Lake Dunstan in Cromwell, the weather was stunning with very hot summer days  and  balmy evenings. Just right for enjoying happy hour, (G&T, beer, crackers and cheese)  with our neighbours in the campground. after a leisurely stroll along the lake. 

We also parked up beside the mighty Clutha River at Millers Flat, otherwise known as the ‘fruitlands’  where we tasted the famous Roxburgh apricots and had a tasty dinner at the old tavern across the historic bridge built in 1897.

I was thrilled to find an old hand painted aerial photo on the wall. My first job was using photo oils to hand paint photos just like these. A meaningful memory for me and a great overview of the Clutha River at Millers Flat.

Fiordland

We spent a few days relaxing in Manapouri before heading to Te Anau, to catch up with friends, and attempt to capture an image of Aurora Australis -I found just a bit of airglow at Manapouri.

We decided to take the coach tour to the Milford Sound, where we boarded the Milford Haven to cruise  through the Milford Sound towards the Tasman Sea. Although we had been there before, Milford Sound never ceases to amaze me within its spectacular mountains and magical waterfalls. 

If you never been inside a waterfall, this is the place to do just that. I got soaked, my camera got soaked – and it was magical. The water tasted pure and delicious on my tongue (surprisingly – my camera survived another wet adventure).

Entering the Tasman Sea

Southland:

Bluff is the southern- most harbour at the bottom of the South Island.   Bluff is also world famous for these delicious Bluff Oysters. 

Some say that Bluff oysters are the finest in the world. They are grown slowly in the cold clean waters of the Foveaux Strait. In season, (March till about August) they are dredged by Bluffs oyster fleet. Oystering first began commercially at Stewart Island in the 1860s.”

Bluff Oysters

Many years ago the North island company I worked for had a social club which organized a  weekly shipment of fresh Bluff Oysters to be flown in. I had a regular order for 5 dozen bluff oysters which arrived each Friday of the season.  All weekend we would eat oysters. We ate raw oysters, battered oysters, oysters wrapped in bacon   (Angels on horseback), and oysters baked in a creamy white sauce. The taste was divine every which way they were prepared. Another meaningful memory!

And in my world I did find the pearls. 

The Bluff Hill Lookout offered spectacular views across Fouveaux Strait  to Stewart Island/Rakiura, our next destination. 

We had decided on a day trip rather than struggle to find  expensive and scarce accommodation.  The weather was perfect for the one hour catamaran crossing of Foveaux Strait, notorious for its usually wild weather.  

We  scheduled an island bus tour in the morning and a boat ride with guided bush walk on  Ulva Island, a wildlife sanctuary, in the afternoon. These kept us busy. No time for tasting any food at  all but we drank in the peaceful scenery and spectacular sights. We heard the bird calls as we trod carefully and quietly along the forest track. We touched the texture of the trees and leaves.

It was a truly a tasty feast for all my senses. 

https://alwayswrite.blog/2022/03/09/wqw-five-senses-taste

This is also my contribution for Sunday Stills https://secondwindleisure.com/2022/03/06/sunday-stills-making-meaningful-memories/

10 thoughts on “WQW – 5 Senses: Tasting the memories

  1. What a wonderful tour of New Zealand and surrounding areas, Liana! So nice to see you back to your blog! You definitely caught some wonderful, memorable moments, even the faint aurora! How cool to sail inside a waterfall, and glad your camera survived the experience!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Terri. It was such a great trip. I’m still editing photos so I have to be careful not to overdo sharing. I’m pleased to try to get back to more regular blogging. Thank goodness for your prompts to get me going again. Liana

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Wow, you make New Zealand look delightful. I’d love to have been along on the boat ride on the Milford Sound. The lake looked spectacular, too. You’ve given us a taste of heaven. Thank you so much, Liana. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you for commenting. We had an amazing road trip. Milford Sound is indeed a special place. We were so lucky with the weather for most of our six weeks travelling. Liana

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Good weather makes all the difference, doesn’t it? They say, though that what we remember years later are the mess-ups! With your lovely documentary, that shouldn’t be the case with your trip.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Catching up from the week before lasts posts. 🙂 I love your opening quote. I also love the idea of relating it to traveling. My daughter visited NZ in 2019 and LOVED millford sound. It was raining the day they went but they still enjoyed it. They spent 14 days traveling from the north island to the south and back. I wish I liked oysters more. I don’t care for the texture. I did try some back in August when my hubby and I were on a long weekend trip and ate at a local oyster farm. I ate them in honor of my dad who had passed away a few weeks earlier.

    Liked by 1 person

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